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“Christ at 33” (detail) by Hofmann

Why it Matters Who Jesus Is

I have been reading, with both profit and delight, Thomas Joseph White’s latest book, The Incarnate Lord: A Thomistic Study in Christology. Fr. White, one of the brightest of a new generation of Thomas interpreters, explores a range of topics in this text—the relationship between Jesus’ human and divine natures, whether the Lord experienced the beatific vision, the theological significance of […]

"Jesus Opens the Eyes of the Man Born Blind" (detail) by Duccio

What Can We Learn from the Healing of the Man Born Blind?

A reflection on the the Healing of the Man Born Blind — proclaimed during the Mass readings for the Fourth Sunday of Lent (Year A) — First Samuel 16:1, 6-7, 10-13; Psalms 23:1-3, 3-4, 5, 6; Ephesians 5:8-14; John 9:1-41 or 9:1, 6-9, 13-17. In St. John’s Gospel, there is the account of the healing of the man born blind (John 9:1-41). It is the […]

"The Annunciation" (detail) by Van der Weyden

The Annunciation—When All Creation Held its Breath

The Moment There is a moment in time which defines all history; a moment to which all that came before, all that has come after and all that is yet to come, points as supremely significant.  On March 25th of each Liturgical Year, we remember the event that took place then—the moment when the Blessed Virgin Mary gave her fiat to God’s request that was […]

Photography © by Andy Coan

The Man Born Blind Sees the Lion of Judah

Reflection on the Mass readings for the Fourth Sunday of Lent (Year A) — First Samuel 16:1, 6-7, 10-13; Psalms 23:1-3, 3-4, 5, 6; Ephesians 5:8-14; John 9:1-41 or 9:1, 6-9, 13-17. The Lion of Judah is no tame lion.  Neither is he predictable. While walking along the streets of Jerusalem one day, Jesus sees a common enough sight in the Holy City.  […]

Living the Joy of the Gospel

Pope Francis speaks frequently of the need to go out to the peripheries.  While this can be interpreted many different ways, I recently I saw this lived out—not in the “peripheries” of the inner-city poor or on the faraway soil of a foreign country, but smack in the middle of Hollywood. Let’s face it. When it comes to places we […]

On Living with Greater Intention

“Will-power. A very important quality. Don’t despise little things, for by the continual practice of denying yourself again and again in such things — which are never futile or trivial — with God’s grace you will add strength and resilience to your character. In that way you will first become master of yourself, and then a guide, a chief, a […]

Don’t Ever Ask Dad to Babysit the Kids!

Dads should just never be asked to babysit the kids. It’s not because dad is not competent.  No, he’s able to do all the things the kids require, even if he has to use the trial and error method to figure out what seems obvious to mom. It’s not because dad doesn’t really want to spend time with the kids.  He loves […]

Out of the Darkness and Into the Light

A recent Lenten homily spoke to my heart in a profound manner.  Our rural Catholic community doesn’t boast of many grandiose things.  We are a humble church and a humble people.  But our pastor spoke boldly and confidently.  He pierced the hearts of many with these words: “God is challenging us to step outside of what is comfortable and familiar.  […]

A Review of Patience and Humility

A review of Patience and Humility, Will Bernard Ullathorne, O.S.B., Sophia Institute Press — May 1, 1998 So—it’s the third week of Lent and you’re still trying to decide what to take on or give up. Some of our Lenten goals go well, others not so well. If you’re stuck, you may want to start small. Finding a book entitled Patience and […]

Daily Reflection — A Generous Heart

“Judge not, and you will not be judged; condemn not, and you will not be condemned; forgive, and you will be forgiven; give, and it will be given to you; good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap. For the measure you give will be the measure you get back. Why do you see […]