Stacy A. Trasancos

About the Author

Stacy Trasancos is a wife and homeschooling mother of seven. She holds a PhD in Chemistry from Penn State University and a MA in Dogmatic Theology from Holy Apostles College and Seminary. She worked as a chemist for DuPont in the Lycra® and Teflon® businesses.

She teaches Chemistry and Physics for Kolbe Academy Online and Homeschool Program and serves as the Science Department Chair. She is teaching a set of summer mini-workshops titled “Science in the Light of Faith” for students, parents, other educators, or any Christian interested in the nuts and bolts of navigating science.

Similarly, she is teaching a “Reading Science in the Light of Faith” at Holy Apostles College & Seminary next Fall (2016). The course is funded by a John Templeton Foundation grant through John Carroll University for teaching science in seminaries. She is on the Board of Directors for ITEST (the Institute for the Theological Encounter with Science and Technology) where the essays from the course will be shared with the public.

Also in the Fall of 2016, she will teach a “Theological History of Science” course at Seton Hall University, where her mentor, the late Fr. Stanley L. Jaki was a distinguished professor. She is the author of Science Was Born of Christianity: The Teaching of Fr. Stanley L. Jaki.

Her new book, Particles of Faith: A Catholic Guide to Navigating Science is forthcoming with Ave Maria Press…

She teaches, researches, and writes from her family’s 100-year old restored mountain lodge in the Adirondack mountains, where her husband and children (and two German Shepherds) remain her favorite priorities. Here is her website.

Author Archive Page

“First Human” Discovered in Ethiopia: What It Means For Catholics

Last week, Professor Brian Villmoare’s team at the University of Nevada Las Vegas reported in Science the discovery and analysis of a fossil in Ethiopia, the partial lower jaw of what is thought to be the oldest known member of the genus Homo. The “hominin mandible with teeth” is identified as the left side of an adult jaw with partial and complete […]

"Creation of Adam" (detail) by Michelangelo

Pope Benedict XVI on Creation and Evolution: “Complementary Realities”

In 1981, Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, then Cardinal Ratzinger, developed a catechesis for adults on the creation narratives because, he noted, creation catechesis was nearly absent from teaching, preaching, and theology. His catechesis was in the form of four Lenten homilies given in the cathedral of Munich. Later in 1986, and at the request of many people, he published the […]

Five Questions From Catholics About Evolution

In elementary school, children learn about dinosaurs and fossils, how fossils form, how paleontologists reconstruct skeletons of animals from the past using those fossils. There seems no difficulty whatsoever accepting that all kinds of plants and animals lived on the Earth before people lived. Meanwhile, the Catholic children learn about Creation, Adam and Eve, Original Sin, Noah’s Ark, and the birth, life, death, […]

"Creation of Adam" (detail) by Michelangelo

You are Dust: The Chemical Origin of Life

On Ash Wednesday, the minister marks the cross on our foreheads with ashes and says, “Remember, you are dust and to dust you will return.” It is a reminder that we are human, that in death our bodies will remain on the earth and decay while the souls of the just will go to meet God and wait to be reunited with […]

Is Reviling a Mortal Sin?

Some time ago I made a rule for myself that I would not call out another Catholic writer by name and criticize that person. I had a sense that nothing good ever came from it because 1) I’d tried it a few times, 2) felt uneasy about it, and 3) found that, in fact, nothing good ever came from it. Chalk it […]

From Faith Came Science: Condemnations of 1277

In 1277, Étienne Tempier, the Bishop of Paris, issued a list of 219 condemned propositions relating to details of Aristotelian texts that were irreconcilable with the Christian worldview. These propositions were not binding on Christians, but served as a guide for the scholars at the University of Paris. The decree largely dealt with the eternity of the world and creation. […]

Should We Pray Out Loud?

Elizabeth Pack Photography One of the questions St. Thomas Aquinas posed in his short treatise on prayer (Summa Theologiæ, II-II, Q. 13, Art. 12) was, “Should prayer be vocal?” The answer is: Yes, if it increases our devotion. Obviously, group prayer should be vocal. The priest at Mass must pray out loud so the faithful can know the prayers that are being offered, and so […]

Does Your Mind Wander When You Pray?

Do you have trouble paying attention while praying? Does your mind wander? Do you sometimes fall asleep? Do you forget where you were and stop? Do you then feel ashamed and disappointed in yourself? Do you get frustrated? Do you want to give up trying to pray long prayers like the Rosary? Do you give up? Or do you keep […]

Thoughts About Online Catholic Education

I should explain my background before hypothesizing. I taught high school chemistry in a Texas public school in the 1990’s for two years. I was 21, three years into a biology degree, and had taken no education classes because I had no plans to teach. But science teachers were in demand, the university granted me a Broadfield Science bachelor degree, and I became a teacher. […]

Raise Prudent Kids, Not Independent Kids

What the Experts Say It is popular for parenting magazines to publish articles with advice from child psychologists about how to raise independent kids. But what does that mean? One psychologist tells parents in an article in Parenting Magazine titled “Flying Solo: Raise an Independent Kid” that no matter how loving they are, they are not the ones able to help […]