Stacy A. Trasancos

About the Author

Stacy Trasancos is a wife and homeschooling mother of seven. She holds a PhD in Chemistry from Penn State University and a MA in Dogmatic Theology from Holy Apostles College and Seminary. She worked as a chemist for DuPont in the Lycra® and Teflon® businesses.

She teaches Chemistry and Physics for Kolbe Academy Online and Homeschool Program and serves as the Science Department Chair. She is teaching a set of summer mini-workshops titled "Science in the Light of Faith" for students, parents, other educators, or any Christian interested in the nuts and bolts of navigating science.

Similarly, she is teaching a "Reading Science in the Light of Faith" at Holy Apostles College & Seminary next Fall (2016). The course is funded by a John Templeton Foundation grant through John Carroll University for teaching science in seminaries. She is on the Board of Directors for ITEST (the Institute for the Theological Encounter with Science and Technology) where the essays from the course will be shared with the public.

Also in the Fall of 2016, she will teach a "Theological History of Science" course at Seton Hall University, where her mentor, the late Fr. Stanley L. Jaki was a distinguished professor. She is the author of Science Was Born of Christianity: The Teaching of Fr. Stanley L. Jaki.

Her new book, Particles of Faith: A Catholic Guide to Navigating Science is forthcoming with Ave Maria Press...

She teaches, researches, and writes from her family's 100-year old restored mountain lodge in the Adirondack mountains, where her husband and children (and two German Shepherds) remain her favorite priorities. Here is her website.

Author Archive Page

The Order and Symmetry in the Rosary

I have been praying the Rosary ever since a lady named “Cookie” sent me a hand-made set of beads in the mail as a gift. I remember looking at the necklace contraption wondering what exactly one is supposed to do with it. What am I supposed to pray for? What happens if I don’t do it correctly? Why do I have […]

These Thy Atoms

Thorough Materialism “The Catholic should be the most thorough materialist.” —Fr. Stanley L. Jaki[1] True to the late Fr. Jaki’s dictum, I am a thorough materialist. I see nature as a system of interacting matter and forces. My four-year-old son has apparently acquired my enthusiasm. He heard me say that everything is made of atoms, and he took that idea […]

The Uniquely Christian Birth of Science

This is the final of a six-part series on the teaching of Fr. Stanley L. Jaki. To understand how science was born of Christianity, it is helpful to first understand “Fr. Stanley Jaki’s Definition of Science” and “The Stillbirths of Science in Ancient Cultures.” By science Fr. Jaki meant what we now call “modern science,” which is the application of mathematics to observations […]

Fr. Jean Buridan’s Impetus Theory

This is the fifth part of a six-part series on the teaching of Fr. Stanley L. Jaki that science was born of Christianity. To understand how science was born of Christianity, first “Fr. Stanley Jaki’s Definition of Science” must be understood. Then “The Stillbirths of Science in Ancient Cultures” can be understood; by science Fr. Jaki meant what we now call “modern […]

The Christian Middle Ages and the Greek Scientific Corpus

This is the fourth in a series of six essays. I like to review before starting so the current essay is read in context. To understand how science was born of Christianity, first “Fr. Stanley Jaki’s Definition of Science” must be understood. Then “The Stillbirths of Science in Ancient Cultures” can be understood; by science Fr. Jaki meant what we now […]

The Radical Scientific View of Biblical Cultures

To review so far, “Fr. Stanley Jaki’s Definition of Science” must first be understood to further grasp what he meant by “science was born of Christianity.” Then it is helpful to understand what Fr. Jaki meant by “The Stillbirths of Science in Ancient Cultures.” The essay below will show how the biblical and early Christian world view was 1) conducive to […]

The Stillbirths of Science in Ancient Cultures

This essay is the second in a teaching series. The first essay is “Fr. Stanley Jaki’s Definition of Science.” Fr. Stanley L. Jaki used the phrase “stillbirths of science” in reference to the ancient cultures of Egypt, China, India, Babylon, Greece, and Arabia. The lifeless imagery was the counter-analogy to his claim that science was born of Christianity. Jaki was […]

Fr. Stanley Jaki’s Definition of Science

This Teaching Series Holy Tuesday, April 7, marked six years since Fr. Stanley L. Jaki died in Madrid in 2009. Toward the end of his life, Fr. Stanley L. Jaki asked himself, “What is the point to work hard on a topic, though only to see in the end that what one tried to transmit on the basis of decades […]

Is It Better to Love or Be Loved?

Is it better to love or be loved? It is a simple question, but it can change the way you orient your whole life. Wouldn’t being loved by more people mean that you are a better person? Wouldn’t it feel better to be loved by lots of people? Wouldn’t it bring you greater honor? Isn’t honor a good thing? Wouldn’t […]

As It Was in the Beginning is Now, and Ever

The other night, I was frustrated with my critics, frustrated with my children, and frustrated with my disobedient German shepherds who take my donning of a coat to mean the dawning of a walk, even near midnight.  I was grateful to be pulled outside though. The sky was clear beyond bits of late snow, one of those spirity nights when the winds of impending […]