Being an Extraordinary Catholic is No Easy Task

woman-praying-profile-featured-w740x493Being an extraordinary Catholic is no easy task, but Randy Hain’s new book Joyful Witness – How To Be An Extraordinary Catholic gives examples and insights of just those Catholics – those joyful witnesses. These are people who, as Randy writes, have become “better versions of themselves.” Not everyone he writes about planned on being so extraordinary – it was grace and determined will that led them on their mission.

Each chapter outlines a unique person called to be a special servant using his or her God given talents. Some struggled before they reached their goal, others saw a need and responded. These Catholics are the ‘quiet’ servants – ordinary people. They never seek affirmation or recognition, but serve unselfishly. They are not overwhelmed by their witness, but find deep satisfaction in what they do. They have given themselves over to Christ – unreservedly.

The stories are not just for enjoyment, but for illumination as well. At the end of each chapter, Hain offers suggestions for consideration from the life in the person featured to be practiced in the reader’s own journey. As well, the author has added several in-depth questions for reflection. These two exercises round out the chapters and encourage meditation.

There are many examples.

  • Joe Zuniga started a Catholic school when he and his wife found themselves struggling to find good Catholic education for their eleven children – quite an accomplishment. And all the while struggling with his own career.
  • Staci Gulino, a Catholic convert from a fundamentalist Baptist upbringing, spent a lot of time searching for God. As a mental health professional she came to realize that Christ is part of the overall healing of a person. Her strong faith has enabled her to combine her career, marriage, children and host a Catholic radio show.
  • Andy LaVallee from Boston grew up in a strong Catholic family and drifted away, put his business first, and generally did not live an honest life. A chance encounter with Jim Caviezel, star of The Passion of the Christ that started his turnaround. Jim invited him to go to Medjugorje. Reluctant to go at first, he had a conversion experience on the trip that turned his life around. Not only did he renew his personal life, he changed his business practices and became a servant leader. And, Andy says, “It works.”

The following are just a sampling of the practices that brought these Joyful Witnesses to a “better version hain-and-joyful-witness-cover-featured-w740x493of themselves.”

See Christ in everyone.

Turn adversity into ministry.

Be a lifelong student of Catholicism.

Pray throughout the day.

Hold nothing back.

Get involved.

Be good stewards of your gifts and talents.

It all matters.

Model the Catholic faith everywhere.

Take any opportunity to pray with and for your children.

Doing something is better than doing nothing.

. . . . there are many more . . .

After reading this book you’ll want your Catholic joy to show on your face! The book concludes with ways to recognize Catholic Heroes. “Make being Catholic inviting and attractive.” Modeling the love of Christ in our lives, everyday, everywhere, in any circumstances. This takes grace, trust that God knows what he’s doing for you in your circumstances, courage and patience.

Take up the challenge to be an extraordinary servant. Everyone is needed and called.

As Hain says, “Start with the end in mind.”


Editor’s Note:  Would you like to learn more about “regular Catholic heroes” and the joyful witness they give for Christ and the Catholic faith?  Randy Hain’s exciting sixth book, Joyful Witness: How to Be an Extraordinary Catholic (Servant Books) is now available through Amazon and all Catholic bookstores!

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About the Author

A native of New Orleans, Mary Hartwell spent thirteen years in Catholic school taught by the Dominicans and the Sisters of the Most Holy Sacrament. She holds a B.A. degree with honors in English and Communications from the University of North Texas. She has studied Theology at The College of St. Thomas More in Ft. Worth, Texas and participated in the College’s winter term in Rome, Italy.

In her faith life Mary participated and held a leadership role in Little Rock Scripture Study for six years and participated for five years in Catholic Scripture Study. She also participated in a Faith and Reason class for five years.

In her work career she has been publications director for a non-profit and has worked in promotions in television. She has done technical writing and written and produced newsletters and other collateral for business.

Mary and her husband attend St. Peter Chanel Catholic Church in Roswell, Georgia and have two sons and two granddaughters.

She believes there is no writing – only re-writing.

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