Prayer and Goosebumps

A couple quick thoughts on prayer:

1.)  How often do you say to someone, “I will keep you in my prayers,” and then completely forget to pray for them? I’m embarrassed to even think about the number of times I have been guilty of the I’ll-Say-I’ll-Pray (but that doesn’t mean I actually will) Syndrome. One day I was given the most brilliant piece of advice—advice that made me feel ecstatic for having received it and stupid for not having thought of it myself.

The advice is pretty simple: When you tell someone that you will pray for them, as soon as you turn around (or hang up the phone, or hit “send” on your email, etc.), SAY A PRAYER FOR THEM! Genius, I know. Now, if you are as forgetful as I am, you will have at least said one prayer—one meaningful, promised prayer—for someone in need.

2.)  Many times as I’m going about my day-to-day activities, a random friend or relative of mine may pop into my thoughts. Years ago, I started a habit. When someone in my life, even if it’s a minor acquaintance, comes to mind unexpectedly, I pause what I am doing and say a prayer for him or her, thinking that they could need one (and, well, we always do need them).

The other day an old out-of-state friend happened to infiltrate my thinking as I was working on something that had absolutely nothing to do with him. I took my busy hands off the keyboard, crossed myself, and offered up a prayer for him and his intentions. We hadn’t spoken in quite some time, but somehow I decided to text him that I had just thought about him and was praying for him.

“Get out!!!” He replied, verbatim (triple exclamation marks and all) in his return text message. “I just got out of an important interview.”

Why was I surprised? As if I hadn’t ever heard of the Holy Spirit…

“What was your interview for?” I asked.

The Seminary.

Goosebumps, anyone?

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About the Author

Katie Warner is a Catholic wife, stay-at-home mother, speaker, writer, and evangelist who is passionate about taking small steps toward a more meaningful and spiritual life, and helping others do the same.

She is the author of Head & Heart: Becoming Spiritual Leaders for Your Family (Emmaus Road Publishing, Fall 2015), a book that offers practical strategies and inspiring stories to help men and women better lead and love their families toward heaven.

Katie writes and speaks about a variety of spiritual and practical topics, and has presented in venues like the National Catholic Bible Conference and numerous Legatus chapters, the Eucharistic Congress of Atlanta, EWTN radio, and on EWTN television. She is also a presenter for the Symbolon RCIA and Opening the Word programs produced by the Augustine Institute. Katie is one of the original contributing writers for The Integrated Catholic Life and a correspondent for the National Catholic Register.

Katie works very part-time (usually during toddler naps and late at night) as the Manager of Communication and Evangelization for Catholics Come Home, a national Catholic evangelism apostolate working to invite fallen-away Catholics and non-Catholics home to the Catholic Church. She holds a graduate degree in Catholic Theology, specializing in Evangelization and Catechesis, from the Augustine Institute in Denver, Colorado. Her favorite ministry work—and day-job—is family life, and she enjoys homemaking and mothering in sunny Southern California, where she lives with her husband and son.

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7 Comments

  1. Guilty as charged!

    Our family came up with a short addendum to our nightly prayers. “We pray for all those who have asked for our prayers and all those who have no one to pray for them.”

    Doesn’t completely leave me off the hook but it’s something that we are at least aware of.

    Thanks for your insight Katie!!!

  2. Hi Katie,

    Great testimony. This happens far more frequently than many people realize. After all, “the prayers the righteous availeth much.”

  3. I love this, Katie! I’m going to start up this practice right away. I’ll sheepishly admit I’m terrible about follow through when it comes to these things. Thanks for the important reminder and excellent advice!

  4. While I do try and say a prayer immediately when I say I will pray for someone, I know I’m bad at this. So sometimes I ask Mother Mary to pray for all the people that I said I would pray for, and entrust her with the task since her memory is better than mine! Thank goodness we have the saints and the angels to help us poor imperfect mortal souls out!

  5. I actually do this diligently, and it has been a beautiful blessing! I’m not sure when it began, but when someone asks for a prayer, I immediately say a Hail Mary for them. My thought has always been “When I ask someone to pray for me it is because I sincerely need prayer on my behalf” and how devastated I would be if that certain someone, who promised to pray, didn’t do it … and what a wonderful thing to pray for someone even as you just happen to think of them! Love this 🙂

  6. Thank you for posting this article on what I’ve thought about many times myself. I’m glad I’m not the only one who has these thoughts and/or questions about the such. This really resonates with me right now because last night my son and I were at a Confirmation Orientation meeting and the main topic of course was the Holy Spirit and how he works in our lives. Just another indication of how he is working right now by me reading and responding to this article. Thank you and please keep posting! By the way, my response at the end of your article, “Get Out!!!”…and yes goosebumps!

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