Life in the Late Republic: The Catholic role in America after virtue

Every now and then you read something that simply must be read and shared.  This recent address by Archbishop Charles Chaput to the Fellowship of Catholic Scholars is deeply insightful into the challenges Catholics face today and what we must do to get back on track.  I encourage you to read this, share your comments and pass it along to your friends.

Life in the Late Republic: The Catholic role in America after virtue

Archbishop Chaput delivered the following remarks to the Fellowship of Catholic Scholars on Sunday, Sept. 26.

Exactly 70 years ago, in 1940, Father John Courtney Murray gave a series of three college talks.  For his theme, he chose the “concept of a Christian culture.”  After his death, his Jesuit brothers fused the talks into a single essay called “The Construction of a Christian Culture.” It’s a modest word change.  But that title – the construction of a Christian culture – is a good place to begin our thoughts this morning. – Read more…

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3 Comments

  1. Randy,

    >>The central problem in constructing a Christian culture is our lack of faith and the cowardice it produces. We need to admit this. And then we need to submit ourselves to a path of repentance and change, and unselfish witness to others. The reality of life in the late years of the American republic is that “we have sought first the kingdom of earth,” as Murray said, “and we begin to discover that in the process, millions upon millions have been disinherited from both the kingdom of earth and the Kingdom of God.”

    The role of Catholics in America is exactly the opposite of what we’ve been doing for half a century or more – compromising too cheaply, assimilating, fitting in, fleeing from who we really are as believers; and in the process, being bleached out and digested by the culture we were sent to make holy. < <
    These words really strike home in our own discoveries made as members in our local chapter of the Woodstock Business Conference. Before we can transform the world, we must allow God to transform our souls. We need to seek the truth of who we are, who our God is, and why He has placed us here on this earth.

    Deacon Mike

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